How to permanently delete Partition content on Windows 10 or Windows 11

How to permanently delete Partition content on Windows 10 or Windows 11



How to permanently delete the contents of the partition on Windows 10 or Windows 11 Windows has built-in tools that allow you to write zeros on the drive and securely delete its contents, and ensure that deleted files on the drive cannot be recovered, whether you want to delete an internal drive or an external USB drive, here's how to do it.



It is often possible to recover deleted files from a drive, and if this is possible it depends on a number of factors, where if the drive is a traditional magnetic drive with a turntable then the deleted files are simply marked as deleted and will be replaced in the future. It makes recovering deleted data easy, this should not be the case on modern solid state drives as you should use TRIM automatically to ensure that deleted files are deleted instantly (this helps in speed), however it is not as simple as storage Mechanical storage vs Solid State External storage devices such as USB flash drives do not support TRIM which means that deleted files can be recovered from USB flash drive.


And to prevent this from happening you can "wipe" the drive, this is actually a very simple process where Windows will write zeros or other junk data to each drive sector by overwriting any data that already exists with junk data, this is a particularly important step These should be taken when selling or otherwise disposing of a computer or USB drive or drive that contains sensitive private data, and slow if the drive is encrypted it provides a lot of extra protection, assuming that attacker can't get your encryption key They won't be able to recover deleted files from the drive - they won't even be able to access files that haven't been deleted yet.


To write zeros on the contents of any drive all you have to do is perform a full drive format, and before doing so keep in mind that this will completely erase all the files on the drive, well you can't make a full-format Windows system drive while running Windows From it, this method is ideal for internal drives that do not have your operating system installed, USB flash drives, other external storage and any partition you want to delete. To get started, open File Explorer and find the drive you want to delete, right-click on it and select Format.


 

Check "Quick Format" under the Quick Format options, this ensures that Windows 10 or Windows 11 makes full format instead, and according to Microsoft documentation since Windows Vista Windows always writes zeros on the entire disk when performing full format , And you can change any other configuration options you want here just make sure the Quick Format is not checked, (if you are not sure what to choose, leave the options here in their defaults), and when ready click Start to format the drive, and it may take some time depending on the size and speed of the disk.


Warning: Formatting will erase everything on the drive, make sure you have a backup of any important files before proceeding.




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