How to get clear and brilliant details from your photos

How to get clear and brilliant details from your photos


There may be a lot of details you don't see in your photos, the good news is that you can often get those details back by expanding the dynamic range of your photos to make your photos more balanced and interesting. .


What is the dynamic range?


In photography and video, Dynamic Range refers to the range of light visible in a scene. Often measured at 'breakpoints' where the human eye can see 10 to 14 stops, key points beyond the limits of the dynamic range of a scene may swell while d the shadows are dark and muddy, you can see an example of blown highlights in the image below, Since the subject is dark and takes up a large portion of the image, the camera preferred the shadow detail (the dark parts) on the highlights (the lighter parts), and since this was pulled on a smartphone the dynamic range is somewhat limited compared to cameras with larger sensors.



Many digital SLRs and mirrorless cameras exceed the dynamic range visible to the human eye, while cinema cameras are preferred because of their high dynamic range and ability to capture "flat" images with many detail, and some formats retain Images with this data are invisible while other formats such as JPEG ignore it to save space, the more dynamic range a camera can capture the more detail is available to you when editing your image , this allows you to do things like light shadows and reduce the intensity of the highlights so that the details are not crushed or destroyed. The term dynamic range is used in many different areas, with high dynamic range TVs and monitors ( or HDR) are becoming more common and many smartphones now have this feature as well. Any time compared to older Standard Dynamic. Spread technology (SDR).


Maximize the dynamic range on the camera


And if you want to get the most out of a photo, shoot with RAW where possible. This format captures as much detail as possible in the scene, including details you may not see in their RAW counterparts.JPEG or HEIC, e.g. A 24MP RAW image from a Sony APS-C camera without a mirror takes up about 25MB of space while JPEG on the "Fine" setting from the same camera is only about 7MB. Photos smaller than a smartphone in HEIC or JPEG format take up only a few megabytes of space.

How to get clear and brilliant details from your photos


And RAW shooting should be a conscious choice when you know you want to take the next photo, and you probably don't want to use RAW for most of your smartphone's shots because your device can quickly run out of space, you can shoot in ProRAW on new iPhones or use an app that allows RAW capture On older iPhones, Android devices can also capture RAW and it is usually activated by toggle on the camera interface, and if the camera Your stock does not support RAW so Android apps like ProCam X and The Open Camera will allow the feature on most devices, and smaller smartphones Convenient but not comparable to shooting with a digital SLR or camera without a mirror , these devices have much larger sensors that allow more light, capture more detail and higher image quality, and many are compact. cameras including the Sony RX100 range and Ricoh GR cameras capture RAW well, consider exposure when shooting too, if you are shooting a scene with bright light points and deep shadows try to put the exposure right in the middle, if you overexpose For highlights you may find it difficult to restore shadows (and vice versa), you may use the camera's exposure compensation to adjust the scene, and you may want to refer to the histogram if the camera offers this feature.



How to recover dynamic range in your photo editor


There is no ‘right way’ to edit an image, you may prefer to do different things from the steps below and this is good, the most important thing is to understand how different modifications affect your image, the the best way to learn is to experiment, these steps should work on almost any image editing software From premium options like Adobe Camera RAW (Photoshop and Lightroom) to more affordable options like Affinity Photo, you can also use free software like GIMP, Apple's photo apps on macOS or mobile, or Google's Snapseed for Android or iOS. This is a photo of the sunset camp site that actually looks good very straight from the camera (Sony A6500 shot in RAW format).

While a scene is fun to look at, a lot of details can be hard to find, and we’ll start revisiting some of those details by lowering the highlights and adding shadows.

How to get clear and brilliant details from your photos

The idea here is to "flatten" the image a bit and render some of the details that were missing in the first shot, and if we zoom in a little you will now be able to see what the sun looks like through the trees. .




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