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Cure through Yoga

 Cure through Yoga




Yoga in a popular position Yoga, one of the world's oldest forms of exercise, is experiencing a renaissance in our stressful modern world. You wouldn't think that a 3,000-year-old exercise could increase in popularity. But now some doctors are even prescribing yoga for a variety of ailments and health conditions, as a stress reliever and to complement other fitness programs.





Talk to anyone who practices yoga and they will quickly extol an endless list of benefits. It seems that beginne

rs quickly become converts. They believe it is the key to good health and happiness in today's world, a common goal for most people. But probably the biggest advertisement for yoga is the fact that it seems to have graduated from the odd, alternative ranks to a position of fairly wide community acceptance.



Healing through Yoga



Cure through Yoga
Healing through Yoga



Housewives, businessmen, athletes, teenagers and seniors practice a variety of yoga positions, meditation and associated breathing exercises. For many, yoga becomes a way of life, often giving a more spiritual side to people's lives, though not necessarily linked to religion. One school of belief holds that chronic, accumulated stress is the reason for many of our modern illnesses.





Proponents of yoga argue that it has a multiplicity of techniques to counteract that cause and, unlike drug therapy, attack the cause, not just the symptoms. It offers, they say, a holistic approach to health and fitness. Many professional athletes, looking for the edge, have turned to yoga as a complementary form of training. They have found that yoga aids their state of mental and physical relaxation between training sessions, and their crucial preparation for major competitions, where a contest is usually won or lost in the mind.





Perhaps one of the biggest attractions of yoga is that it combines physical and mental exercise. It is excellent for posture and flexibility, both key physical elements for most athletes, and in some respects there are strength benefits to be gained. Yoga teachers say the yoga therapy approach is one of the most effective ways to achieve the mental edge athletes seek.





Marian Fenlon, one of Brisbane's leading yoga teachers of the past 20 years, has authored two books on the subject and has had thousands of yoga students. Many of them, in turn, have gone on to become teachers. Believe it or not, she has even taught yoga to footballers. Many years ago, she took the Brisbane Souths rugby league team on an eight-week course and, surprisingly, it was well received. She says yoga therapy has eight components: attitudes, disciplines, posture and flexibility, breathing, sensory awareness, concentration, contemplation and meditation. Yoga can play a substantial supportive role to modern medicine and complement other fitness and exercise programs. While there is not a large aerobic fitness component to yoga therapy, it complements aerobic exercise because of the breathing techniques that can be learned. Therefore, there are advantages to even the most demanding aerobic sports: swimming, cycling, and running. There are numerous documented cases of yoga alleviating or curing serious diseases such as Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, heart disease, and respiratory diseases such as asthma and emphysema.

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